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“Energy” is a subjective sensation and there is really no objective testing that can quantify a person’s level of energy.  For each individual person, energy may also vary during different parts of the day.  For example, some people (I am I this group) wake up early in the morning with a good amount of energy, but by the middle-end of the afternoon, energy levels wane requiring a nap.  If that occurs, good energy ensues into the evening.  For others that are not “morning people”, energy is low early in the morning but much better the entire afternoon and evening.

The quality and quantity of sleep play major roles in the global sensation of energy.  Obviously, a person that has an uninterrupted 7-8 hours of sleep will tend to have much more daytime energy than a person that has 4-5 hours of disrupted sleep.

One of the major “disrupters” of sleep is sleep apnea.  Obstructive sleep apnea (an actual physical obstruction of the airways due to excessive fat) and central sleep apnea (caused in the brain by a certain protein impacting airway neuromuscular control) are much more prevalent in those people with weight control problems.  Snoring loud and alternating periods of not breathing for a short period of time are the usual signs of sleep apnea.

Depression also plays a role in the level of daytimeenergy as studies show that people suffering from depression often have lack of daytime energy as one of the manifestations.

Take a step back and self-evaluate your own level of daytime energy.  If you find yourself struggling to stay awake at times and/or notice that you have much more energy at other times, then use this as yet another motivation to keep working on that weight control.

High energy translates into a happier and healthier person.  Weight control is much better than drinking a Red Bull!