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Many of us that are parents have told our children (on more than one occasion) that there are “consequences of your actions”.  This statement usually followed some action(s) on their parts that were deemed dangerous, ill-conceived, disappointing, etc.  And the consequences?   That would vary from “grounding” the child from activities/things they like to do to taking away certain possessions of theirs for a period of time.  Heck, taking away that cell phone is akin to removing an appendage of theirs!

Let’s flip this discussion to adults.  We have all learned, perhaps many times over, that there are consequences to our own actions.  These actions, whether in our personal lives, financial, professional or other, will bring consequences, with some of those perhaps being positive and others negative.

Focusing on weight control:  There are incredible consequences to our actions when we turn to our health.  Concerning weight control, the consequences of allowing an unhealthy weight to occur include much higher risks of heart disease, diabetes, cancer, pain, depression, increase risk of severe Covid illness and many other illnesses.   Low confidence and low self-esteem are also additional consequences of poor weight control.

Our children that exhibited detrimental behaviors wake up the morning after to learn the consequences of their actions.  Concerning weight control, no one is going to take our car or cell phone away, but cumulatively over time, the consequences will unfortunately come to light.  After a day or evening of allowing detrimental food/drink sources to pass our lips we will wake up the morning after often beating ourselves up for these behaviors.  The morning after is much brighter when we pat ourselves on the back for staying steadfast in our efforts to live a healthier and happier life.  The consequences of successful weight control:  Many more mornings after waking up feeling good.

And for you old song fans out there, enjoy “The Morning After” by Maureen McGovern.